FREE Worksheet for the Movie The Mouse on the Mayflower

Celebrate Thanksgiving and give yourself a little prep time by having your class watch Mouse on the Mayflower and complete this FREE worksheet.

Mouse on the Mayflower is a time-honored Thanksgiving movie. Your class will enjoy the cartoon story told from a mouse’s point of view.

For older students, you can use this FREE comprehension worksheet to increase the educational value a little. The questions are easily completed by a fifth-grader who pays attention. This worksheet is perfect for grades 4-6. In my experience, third graders just stress out and interrupt each other asking for the answers because they missed them.

Here’s a previous post about Mouse on the Mayflower.

Follow up other mouse-eye views of history. My favorite is Ben and Me, a wonderful book by Robert Lawson and a fun cartoon movie by Disney. It’s a great way to teach students about Benjamin Franklin and set the stage for a unit on the American Revolution. Another good mouse story is She Was Nice to Mice: The Other Side of Elizabeth I’s Character Never Before Revealed by Previous Historians, a cute mini-novel written by 80s star Ally Sheedy when she was twelve.

Posted in Academics,FREE Worksheets,Holidays,Social Studies by Corey Green @ Nov 13, 2017

 

New Orleans Halloween

bookThis year, try a New Orleans theme for your Halloween/Fall Festival party.  You can work in geography, history, culture, and Halloween fun.

I did this last year and I can tell you that both the kids and parents just loved it.  It was a nice modification of traditional Halloween-at-school activities.  Parents appreciated the educational angle and they learned something, too.

I grabbed everyone’s attention by showing them that the Disney Haunted Mansion is in New Orleans Square.  I told them that the Disney Haunted Mansion movie is set in New Orleans, too.

Once I had everyone’s attention, I showed them a New Orleans PowerPoint I created.  You can click to download & share it, too (large file: 3+ MB).  It shows pictures of New Orleans to help get everyone in the mood.  I downloaded the Disney “Grim Grinning Ghosts” Haunted Mansion song along with some classic New Orleans jazz to play while we looked at the pictures.

Everyone loved learning about the New Orleans jazz funeral.  I told the children how it evolved from African funeral customs.  A New Orleans jazz band plays a sad song or dirge on the way to the cemetery, and happy tunes for the procession out.  Click here to learn more about the New Orleans jazz funeral.  Here is a sample:

Eileen Southern in The Music of Black Americans: A History wrote, “On the way to the cemetery it was customary to play very slowly and mournfully a dirge, or an ‘old Negro spiritual’ such as ‘Nearer My God to Thee,’ but on the return from the cemetery, the band would strike up a rousing, ‘When the Saints Go Marching In,’ or a ragtime song such as ‘Didn’t He Ramble.’  Sidney Bechet, the renowned New Orleans jazzman, after observing the celebrations of the jazz funeral, stated, “Music here is as much a part of death as it is of life.”

Because I teach third grade, I don’t explain how the New Orleans above-ground cemeteries are necessary so that the bodies don’t wash out on the streets during floods.  This would be very interesting to older students, though.  For third graders,  I  show  pictures of the beautiful New Orleans cemeteries, famous cultural landmarks of the city.

Make sure to teach the kids about New Orleans food, like jambalaya and po’boys.  Explain that po’boy sandwiches can be any simple filling in bread, but that most people think of a shrimp po’boy.   My mom said that when she lived near New Orleans, red beans and rice was everybody’s Monday dinner because Monday was laundry day and the mother was too busy to cook something difficult.  Practical details like that help history and culture come alive for students.

Parents and students alike are very interested in my story about the New Orleans streetcars.  I explained that if you ride the car to the end of the line, the driver will have everybody stand up so he can reverse the seat backs.  In that way, you always ride facing forward.  Click here to see the concept.  The picture is part of my New Orleans PowerPoint presentation.

For a literacy connection, I recommend reading the New Orleans Magic Tree House book A Good Night for Ghosts.  Your students will enjoy learning about New Orleans and Louis Armstrong.  The book touches very, very lightly on segregation.  You can expand on that or wait for another learning opportunity, your choice.   (If you like, teach your students that Ruby Bridges integrated William Frantz Elementary in New Orleans.)  A Good Night for Ghosts shouldn’t be too scary for your class.  It has a mild ghost scene that turns out not to be ghosts after all, but Louis’s friends.

Happy Halloween!

Posted in Academics,Holidays,Social Studies by Corey Green @ Oct 10, 2017

 

Book review: Ashley Bryan’s Puppets

61XELAshKqL._SY496_BO1,204,203,200_Immerse your students in the lush multi-sensory pleasures of Ashley Bryan’s Puppets.  This unique picture book tells the story of Ashley Bryan’s puppets, made from found objects and inspired by African culture.

Ashley Bryan’s Puppets is not a picture book that children would pick up on their own.  It is sophisticated and intellectual, requiring a teacher or parent to help the child derive meaning from it.

…but oh, what depth of meaning!  Ashley showcases dozens of his puppets and highlights several with poems about the puppet’s meaning, inspiration from African culture, and construction.

This picture book would be great to share with a whole class.  I would read a poem or two a day.  That would let the students appreciate each one’s individual beauty.  The students will want to thumb through the book and enjoy the lush photography of each puppet, but their attention spans will appreciate reading just a poem or two at a time.

The class might enjoy making found-object puppets and researching other puppets and puppeteers.  Students might enjoy learning more about Ashley Bryan and reading his many books.   Check out the Ashley Bryan Center in Isleford, Maine.

Posted in Book Reviews,Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ Sep 7, 2015

 

Paddington Bear in the Classroom

Use the success of the Paddington movie to interest your students in the books about everyone’s favorite marmalade connoisseur.

Encourage students to see the movie–or show it to your class in May for an end-of-school-year treat.  Critics have praised the movie, and it’s doing well at the box office.  EW‘s Jason Clark wrote that the film is “closer to the madcap spirit of the Muppets and the lovingly rendered style of a Wes Anderson film than to standard multiplex family fodder.”

Thank goodness the movie did justice to Michael Bond’s wonderful books.  There are so many to choose from, and your students will love them all.  Paddington stories tend to have high reading levels–6.0 according to AR–so they make great readalouds.  It’s important to expose students to text with more complexity than they can handle themselves, and Paddington stories are a fun way to expose students to more complex writing.  You can ask students to concentrate on the story, or you can give them Paddington coloring pages to keep their hands busy while they listen.

There are many great Paddington books.  My favorite, though, is the Paddington Treasury.  This comprehensive collection of Paddington stories will keep your class entertained for an entire school year.  The stories are sorted by category, so stories about mistaken identity are in one section and stories about food are in another.  You can read similar stories together for a lesson on theme or mix them up for variety.

The Paddington Bear – The Complete Classic Series DVD gathers all the classic TV episodes into one affordable disc.  It would be fun to have in the classroom, for a quick video break on Fun Fridays or as a handy bribe to help a sub keep control of the class.

I hope you and your class have a great time with Paddington Bear!

 

Posted in Book Reviews,Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ Jan 19, 2015

 

John Grisham’s series for kids: Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer

TheodoreBooneAR level 5.2
AR points 8
Available at Amazon.com

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer is a clever series written by John Grisham.  Theodore is a thirteen-year-old kid lawyer.  Both of his parents are lawyers, and he spends a lot of time hanging around the courtroom.  (Kid Lawyer is the first book, but it also identifies the series.)

Theo enjoys acting as a kid lawyer for his friends.  He helps a pretty girl get her dog out of the pound and advises his friend on how her parents’ divorce is likely to play out.  However, things turn serious when a potential witness in a murder trial comes to Theo for advice.  Now, only Theo knows who the real killer is—but it isn’t clear what he should do about it.  Theo has to protect his witness.

I think that older elementary studnets will enjoy Theodore Boone.  John Grisham keeps the plot churning.  In everyday and school scenes, the book doesn’t always ring true.  (None of the thirteen-year-old boys in Theo’s class care about girls?)  However, the court scenes and legal issues are the center of the book, and they work quite well.

Theodore Boone is a sophisticated series.  It will appear to intellectual students in grades 4 and up.

Books in the  Theodore Boone series, all available at Amazon.com

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer

Theodore Boone: The Abduction

Theodore Boone: The Accused

Theodore Boone: The Activist

Once you hook fans, direct them to the Theodore Boone website for activities that coordinate with the books.

Send a summons: submit the necessary information and the site will send a summons to a friend or family member.

Odd laws: peruse some unusual laws around the country.  For example, butter substitutes must not be served to Wisconsin inmates, any person in Ohio who loses their pet tiger must notify authorities within an hour, and no one in Michigan may sell a car on Sunday.

Courtroom 101: learn the basics of a courtroom, from the locations to the people.

 

Posted in Book Lists,Book Reviews by Corey Green @ Nov 3, 2014

 

Book review and teaching resources: George Washington’s Spy by Elvira Woodruff

GWSpyAR reading level 4.7
AR points 6
Available at Amazon.com

George Washington’s Spy is the sequel to Elvira Woodruff’s George Washington’s Socks.   In both books, children from Nebraska time-travel to the American Revolution, where they encounter the harsh realities of war and hobnob with famous figures.  Click here for my FREE teaching guide/comprehension questions for George Washington’s Socks.  I highly recommend that novel as a classroom literature study.

George Washington’s Spy succeeds as a sequel.  It pushes the envelope while giving us more of what we enjoyed in the first book.  In this story, the five original characters, a boys’ adventure club and one boy’s little sister, are joined by two eleven-year-old girls.  All the kids time travel to Boston in 1776.  The children are quickly separated.  The boys end up with Patriots, and the protagonist embarks on the titular spy mission.  The girls are taken in by Loyalists.  The characters’ stories intersect as the spy mission becomes deeply entwined with the Loyalists’ household.

Compared to George Washington’s Socks, this story is fairly gritty.  In George Washington’s Socks, the characters encounter tough situations, most notably the death of a young soldier.  George Washington’s Spy takes it up  several notches, which I think puts it firmly in independent-reading territory.  The kids encounter a public flogging, death by tar and feather, medicinal bleeding, and near-death by bayonet.  Believe it or not, all this occurs within a relatively upbeat story, and none of it is described in the kind of colorful detail you would encounter in a novel for adults.  Nevertheless, I think that reading this book aloud or assigning it to the whole class could lead to parent complaints and upset students.

Teaching resources: Click here for Elvira Woodruff’s teaching guide for George Washington’s Spy.  It includes comprehension questions, ideas for class activities recipes, and more.  You could use many of the ideas in a teaching unit for George Washington’s Socks.  The sequel would make a good extension activity for children who want to delve more deeply into the American Revolution.

Posted in Academics,Book Reviews,Social Studies by Corey Green @ Sep 22, 2014

 

FREE printable reading guide for George Washington’s Socks by Elvira Woodruff

GWSocks

George Washington’s Socks is an excellent choice for a literature study to support a social studies unit on the American Revolution.  In the novel, a mysterious rowboat transports five kids to the Battle of Trenton, where they experience the American Revolution firsthand.  The kids interact with Hessian soldiers, revolutionaries, and Washington himself.

About George Washington’s Socks:
AR reading level 5.0
AR points 6
Available at Amazon.com

I wrote a reading guide (teacher’s guide) that helps me keep the students accountable and make sure they are following the story.  I wrote a half-sheet comprehension worksheet for each chapter, so the kids can answer enough questions to show they understand without belaboring the book.  I hope you like the printable study guide.

Click for the FREE printable study guide for use with literature studies or units about George Washington’s Socks.

If you want something more involved than my FREE study guide, you can buy some at Amazon.com.

George Washington’s Socks – Teacher Guide by Novel Units, Inc.

George Washington’s Socks – Student Packet by Novel Units, Inc.

George Washington’s Socks: Novel-Ties Study Guide


 

Using John Medina’s bestselling Brain Rules in the classroom

Brain Rules CoverEvery teacher would benefit from reading Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School.  John Medina’s book explains relevant neuroscience and offers ideas for applying the principles to real life.

Brain Rules would make a be a good choice for a professional development book club.  Medina does an excellent job of explaining each of the Brain Rules, but experienced teachers can definitely expand on his ideas for applications to the classroom.  You will be brimming with ideas after you read Brain Rules—why not get professional development credit for the brainstorm?

Reading Brain Rules inspired some changes (and gave me excellent justification) for some of my teaching techniques:

  • Refer sleepy kids (and their parents) to research that explains why sleep is an essential part of the learning process.
  • Encourage students to be active at recess—no walking or sitting around!  To function at its best, the brain needs the body to move.
  • Employ Medina’s attention technique: every ten minutes, tell a story or do something to re-engage the audience.
  • Provide as many visual aids as possible, because vision trumps all other senses.

One of my favorite sections covered stress.  Medina’s mother was a teacher, and he remembers her frustration when a child with troublesome home circumstances struggled more and more.  Medina’s mother realized that the child faced so much stress that nothing the school did made much difference.  A stressed brain can’t learn.  I know teachers wish that administrators and politicians understood this.

John Medina’s Twelve Brain Rules:

SURVIVAL: The human brain evolved, too.

EXERCISE: Exercise boosts brain power.

SLEEP: Sleep well, think well.

STRESS: Stressed brains don’t learn the same way.

WIRING: Every brain is wired differently.

ATTENTION: We don’t pay attention to boring things.

MEMORY: Repeat to remember.

SENSORY INTEGRATION: Stimulate more of the senses.

VISION: Vision trumps all other senses.

MUSIC: Study or listen to boost cognition.

GENDER: Male and female brains are different.

EXPLORATION: We are powerful and natural explorers.

Medina created a Brain Rules website with many resources.  It has illustrations, charts and video for each brain rule.  Teachers of young children and new parents will enjoy Brain Rules for Baby.  This book has its own section on the site.

Posted in Book Reviews,Tips for Teachers by Corey Green @ Aug 25, 2014

 

Book Review: Fly Away Home by Eve Bunting

Fly Away HomeAR Book level 2.7
AR Points 0.5
Available at Amazon.com

Fly Away Home is a powerful picture book about homelessness.  The narrator and his father live at the airport.  In spare prose, the boy tells his story.

“My dad and I live in an airport . . . the airport is better than the streets.”  So begins the narrative by a young boy who matter-of-factly describes his daily existence.  The simple text touches on many emotions: sadness  because the boy lost his mother, anger and resentment of those who have a home, and hope and hopelessness.  The title Fly Away Home refers to an episode wherein the boy is given hope when a bird trapped in the airport flies to freedom.

This book makes a great readaloud and springboard for discussion.  While listening, students will be so quiet that you could hear a pin drop.  They are utterly sympathetic to the family’s plight.  After reading, discussions of homelessness, loss of a parent, and hope follow naturally.

The illustrations complement the text.  Ronald Himler’s watercolors show the vast impersonal nature of the airport and the efforts of the boy and his father to fade into the background.  Often, the two are quite literally in the background.  The pictures convey intense loneliness and determination.

My students often make the connection to The Pursuit of Happyness starring Will Smith and his son, Jaden Smith.  That movie dramatizes the true story of a man who became a successful stockbroker despite the significant obstacle of having neither money nor a home.

Click here for a lesson plan and worksheet (on page 3.)

Posted in Book Reviews by Corey Green @ Jul 21, 2014

 

Book Review: Across the Alley by Richard Michelson

AR book level 4.0
AR points 0.5
Available at Amazon.comAcross the Alley

Across the Alley is a powerful picture book about what separates people: cultural and racial differences, not the small alley between their buildings.  Richard Michelson’s prose and E.B. Lewis’s illustrations meld into a lovely book that’s perfect for a readaloud and discussion.

The story takes place in New York City, where Abe and Willie live across the alley from each other.  Abe is Jewish and Willie is black.  During the day, they don’t talk.  But at night, they have a secret friendship across the alley.

The boys are hemmed in by their cultures, not only in their friendships but in their pursuits.  However, they find that Abe doesn’t really like playing violin—but Willie is a natural.  Likewise, with a little help from Willie, Abe soon outdoes the teacher when it comes to pitching.

Then one night, Abe’s grandfather catches them.  What will happen to their friendship Across the Alley?

*Spoiler alert: the boys inspire their families and everyone becomes friends in the light.

Across the Alley segues nicely into classroom discussions about a variety of topics:

  • One advantage of befriending people who are different from you is that you learn new things.  How does Across the Alley illustrate this point?
  • Young people have a way of crossing cultural divides, sometimes persuading their families to do so.  How do the young people in Across the Alley influence the old?
  • New York City life and the culture of Jewish and African-American people at the time of Across the Alley
  • Baseball: Negro LeaguesSatchel Paige and other players mentioned in the book
  • Jewish culture: learn about synagogues, such as the one where Willie gives a recital
  • Prejudices against both boys’ cultures: Abe faces anti-Semitism and Willie faces racism.  This isn’t shown in the book, but it was all but inescapable at the time.
Posted in Book Reviews,Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ May 12, 2014

 

Free worksheets for the Tapestry series by Henry Neff

TheHoundOfRowanBring the fantasy series The Tapestry into the classroom with FREE worksheets written by a National Board Certified teacher.

Have you discovered The Tapestry series? It’s a richly imagined fantasy about a Chicago boy who stumbles upon a mysterious Celtic tapestry. His discovery leads him to Rowan Academy, a secret school where great things await him.

The Tapestry series stands out because of the beautiful writing and gorgeous illustrations. The illustrations are my favorite part. Author Henry Neff is a great artist, and it’s interesting to see the world so vividly illustrated by the person that created it.  Click here for a gallery of Henry Neff’s illustrations for Book One: The Hound of Rowan.

The Tapestry series is four books strong and growing, with Book Five set for release in 2015. I met author Henry Neff early on, when we presented together at the International Reading Association Annual Conference West. Henry presented his book; I presented worksheets and ideas for teaching The Tapestry in the classroom.

Books in The Tapestry series, all available at Amazon.com:
The Hound of Rowan: Book One of The Tapestry

The Second Siege: Book Two of The Tapestry

The Fiend and the Forge: Book Three of The Tapestry

The Maelstrom: Book Four of The Tapestry

The Red Winter: Book Five of The Tapestry

My worksheets:
What Do You See? In The Tapestry, Max saw a tapestry depicting the Cattle Raid of Cooley. He later learns that he may have abilities like those of Cuchulain, the Irish folk hero. What qualities link you to heroes of the past?

Vye Detector: In The Tapestry, Vyes are minions of The Enemy. It is important to be able to identify them:

“A vye is not a werewolf. The vye is larger, with a more distorted and hideous face—part wolf, part jackal, part human, with squinty eyes and a twisted snout. In human form, however, they can be most convincing….They are clever in their deceits and their voices are wound with spells to ensnare you.”

After a Vye attack at Rowan, students receive extra training in identifying and fighting Vyes. In the following scenarios, how would you identify and fight a Vye?

Create Your Own Charge: In The Tapestry, students are paired with mythical animals who will be their charges and companions for the rest of their lives. In the book, the animals choose the students. Max was chosen by Nick, the lymrill. It is difficult to describe a mythical animal—until you organize.

Workers for Rowan: Like any school, Rowan depends on workers to help the school run smoothly. The cooks are a reformed hag and ogre, and a leprechaun is the bathroom attendant.  The following creatures want to work at Rowan. Match the creatures with the best job for them.

Enjoy The Tapestry!


 

Cesar Chavez: Watch the movie; share books with your students

Don’t miss Cesar Chavez, the biopic directed by Diego Luna and starring Michael Peña.  Bring Cesar Chavez into your classroom with these beautifully written picture books appropriate for elementary students.

Cesar Chavez’s story adds depth to units in social studies, history and economics:

  • Justice, equality, inequality, civil rights
  • Worker’s rights, unionization, strikes
  • Migrant workers, agriculture’s role in California’s history
  • Freedom marches and demonstrations
  • Latino heritage, Hispanic Heritage Month
  • Chavez’s influences: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Mahatma Ghandi

Picture Books about Cesar Chavez

Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez: this picture book tells Chavez’s story with simple, strong prose by Kathleen Krull.  Yuyi Morales’s beautiful illustrations perfectly complement the setting.  Click here for my book review on Harvesting Hope, featuring ideas for using the book in the classroom.

Cesar: Si, se puede! / Yes, We Cana collection of poems that recreate the life and times of Chavez.  This bilingual edition will capture the attention of your students as Chavez captures their hearts.

Cesar Chavez: A Hero for Everyone: this straightforward, easy-to-read biography is perfect for the Common Core’s emphasis on nonfiction.

Side by Side/Lado a Lado: The Story of Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez/La Historia de Dolores Huerta y Cesar Chavez this bilingual book helps students understand that Cesar didn’t do it on his own.  Strong people like Dolores Huerta were instrumental to the success of the strike and march.

Cesar Chavez: The Struggle for Justice / Cesar Chavez: La lucha por la justicia This bilingual picture book by history professor Richard Griswold del Castillo simply and vividly tells Chavez’s story.

A Picture Book of Cesar Chavez (Picture Book Biography): this beautifully expressive biography tells Cesar Chavez’s life story in an engaging way.

Older students will enjoy the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Viva la Causa kit.  It features a 39 minute film and teaching guide.  Viva la Causa will show how thousands of people from across the nation joined in a struggle for justice for the most exploited people in our country – the workers who put food on our tables.

¡Viva la causa!  ¡Sí, se puede!  The movie and books will make you want to stand up and cheer.

Posted in Academics,Book Lists,Social Studies by Corey Green @ Mar 31, 2014

 

The Life You Imagine: Life Lessons for Achieving Your Dreams by Derek Jeter

TheLifeYouImagineYour students will love to learn life lessons from Yankees superstar Derek Jeter.  His book, The Life You Imagine: Life Lessons for Achieving Your Dreams shows students how the same program that took Jeter from scrawny eight-year old to World Series champion can help them achieve their dreams.  Here are some tips for using the book in the elementary school classroom.

Chapters of The Life You Imagine delve deeply into life lessons such as “Set Your Goals High.”  The format is ideal for a character-building program that can spread over several months of class discussion.

My sister younger is a diehard Yankees fan with a particular devotion to Jeter.  Back when she was a college student with a flexible schedule, she visited my class for lessons based on Jeter’s book.  We made an event out of it.  My sister wore her Jeter jersey while she read from the book and led discussion.  My students loved taking time to reflect on the big picture.

I recommend that you read the book on your own before sharing with your class.  Highlight or underline the best passages in each chapter.  The book is a little long to read aloud to elementary school students, but many passages will resonate with them.  It’s best to read selections from the book rather than to summarize.  That way, Jeter’s voice comes through.  Hearing this advice from a Yankee rather than a teacher makes a difference.

My students really took the lessons to heart.  They enjoyed recapping what Jeter said and thinking of how to apply his advice to their own lives.

Jeter’s advice to set high goals inspired my students.  Jeter points out that many people try to do well—but not many try to be the best.  That’s insightful.  That’s inspiring.  Watch how hard students work when they are trying to be the best, not just good.  They’ll work to be the top student, not just make the honor roll.  They’ll try to be the best player, not just make the team.

Jeter shows that when you set your sights on being the best, your idea of hard work changes.  You dig deeply and find what you’re really made of, what you really can do.  After reading about Jeter’s constant practice, skill building, and dedication to being the best at everything from schoolwork to sports, it’s hard to slack off.  I think it’s no coincidence that my class that most loved Jeter’s book was also the class that won the district writing contest for their class book.  Those students worked very, very hard on that project.  They put in Derek Jeter-level dedication and saw results.

The lesson that most resonated with my students was “The World is not Fair.”  Much of the chapter describes Jeter’s experience of growing up biracial.  He writes about how he was treated differently when he was out with his black cousins versus his white cousins.  He shares memories of being followed around stores by clerks who suspected he planned to shoplift.  He relates that being biracial sometimes affected how he was treated on the ball field.  All of my students were deeply moved by this.  It made them more aware of unfairness and more committed to helping to make the world fair.

My students were inspired by Jeter’s candid talk of failure.  When he was first drafted to the Yankees, he made 56 errors in spring training.  He worried his career was over before it began.  Luckily, Derek Jeter called on his reserves of inner strength and powered through.  Knowing that Jeter faced failure, that he worked so hard for what he has, inspired my students to overcome their own obstacles.

I can’t recommend this book highly enough!  I hope you and your students enjoy it.

To finish the post, I bring you The Play.  Jeter’s famous flip that was so cool, it doesn’t even need his name in it.   It was amazing!

Posted in Book Reviews,Tips for Parents,Tips for Teachers by Corey Green @ Feb 15, 2014

 

Teach Kids about Art with Katie’s Picture Show by James Mayhew

Katie'sPictureShowIntegrate art and literacy with James Mayhew’s terrific books about Katie, a girl who can step inside paintings.  These beautifully illustrated books bring masterpieces to life.

Books in the series, all available at Amazon.com:

Katie’s Picture Show: This is the book that started it all.  Katie visits London’s National Gallery, where five famous masterpieces come to life.

Katie and the Starry Night:  The stars are falling out of Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night!  Can Katie save the day, er, night?

Katie Meets The Impressionists: Katie meets Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

Katie and the Waterlily Pond: A Magical Journey Through Five Monet Masterpieces: An art competition inspires Katie to step into Monet’s masterpieces.  Can she learn how to create a winning entry?

Katie and the Sunflowers:  Katie explores post-Impressionst masterpieces by Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gaugin, and Paul Cezanne.

Katie and the Spanish Princess:  This one’s about  the pride of Spain, Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez.

Katie and the Bathers: Pointilist art comes alive for Katie.  She cools down with the bathers—but floods the gallery!  What now?

Katie and the British Artists:  Katie has a magical art adventure exploring masterpieces by Thomas Gainsborough, John Constable and Joseph Mallord William Turner.

Katie and the Mona Lisa:  Katie tries to cheer La Giaconda up—with disastrous results!

Teaching ideas:

  • Choose a masterpiece and imagine what would happen if Katie stepped into it.
  • Learn more about each masterpiece Katie encounters.
  • Write or discuss alternate adventures for Katie.
  • Write a letter to Katie.  You can suggest topics (requests to become her sidekick, questions, suggestions for new adventures) or you can leave it open-ended.  Students may surprise you with their creativity.
  • Create a Katie’s Picture Show comic book.  Retell sequences from the book or create your own.
  • As a class, prepare a mini-lesson for younger students.  This could involve mini bios on the artists, listing sensory details in the paintings, or fun facts about the masterpieces.  Buddy up with a younger class and reread the book.  Then, partner students and let them present their work to the youngsters.
Posted in Academics,Accelerated Reader (AR),Book Lists,Book Reviews by Corey Green @ Feb 6, 2014

 

Choose Your Own Adventure Books in the Classroom

CYOA_JourneyUndertheSea_medium Kids love Choose Your Own Adventure books!  (CYOA for short.)  The books are fun for everyone, but they are magic for reluctant readers.  Here are some tips for using the books in your classroom.

Buy Choose Your Own Adventure books for all reading levels.  Classics are appropriate for students in grades 4 and up—provided those students read at grade level.  Remind your students that CYOA books look longer than they are, because you don’t read the whole thing.  Just know that the favorites from the 80s are not super easy.  Were kids better readers back then?

Check out the CYOA Dragonlarks series for younger readers.  These books are good for all students in grades 3 and up.  The print is bigger, there are illustrations—these books just look easier.  Everyone in an elementary class can enjoy these, although the truly struggling readers will need a buddy.

Make Choose Your Own Adventure a celebration!  Have class events to promote these books. Some ideas:

Set aside time for groups of 2-4 students to buddy read the books.  You’ll need space for everyone to read aloud, yet not be disturbed by nearby readers.  Your best behaved students might be able to form a group in the hall, freeing up space inside the classroom.

Use the books as readalouds.  This works well if you only have a few titles.  You can read, then let the class vote on what to do next.  This will hook students on the books, and then they can read on their own.

Create CYOA literature circles.  If you have multiple copies of a book, have students read independently, then meet as a group to discuss.  They can talk about different options, analyze character, and create a fun advertisement for the book to interest their classmates in reading it.

Write your own CYOA stories. this is a good challenge project for Gifted students and other high achievers.  Explain that students will want to map out their plot—that’s the easiest way to create the CYOA structure.  Then, they can write the pages for each section.

Click here to visit the Choose Your Own Adventure site.  You can read about the books, order individual titles or small group sets, and learn more about the renaissance of this fun series.  Click here for CYOA teacher’s guides.

Happy adventuring!  Choose wisely.

Posted in Book Reviews,Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ Nov 1, 2013