Get Lost in Reading with Scholastic and the origin-story film “Pan”

“Pan,” the origin story of the famous Peter, premieres October 8.  Scholastic offers free materials that help you use the film as a chance to interest your students in Peter Pan and reading in general.

“Pan” tells how Peter added Pan to his name and ended up in Neverland.  Your students can use the original Peter Pan story as a springboard to spinoffs: origin stories, alternate endings, continuations, and tales from another character’s point of view.  Your students might enjoy creating their own Peter Pan spinoff or spinning off another story.  You can let the students choose or just use whatever is this week’s selection in the reading book.

Click here for Scholastic’s “Get Lost in Reading” feature.  Here are some highlights:
Description: students the Pan screenplay‘s description to inspire their own version of the set
Pan ebook with articles about the movie and connections to literacy
Book recommendation: a Pan-themed sheet to recommend books to classmates

Your students might like other Peter Pan-themed spinoffs.  I enjoy the Peter and the Starcatchers series by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson.  Your students might like to know that the spinoff book became a Tony award-winning spinoff musical.  (How many spins off the original story is that?)

Posted in Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ Sep 28, 2015

 

Bedtime Math–teach kids to love numbers and use math in real life

51SXV06OGNL._SX408_BO1,204,203,200_Bedtime Math promises to do for numeracy what bedtime stories did for literacy.

It all started when Laura Overdeck decided to help her kids love math the way she does.  And boy, does she love math!  Overdeck earned a B.S. in astrophysics from Princeton and an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania.  She combined her love of math, kids and bedtime stories into the Bedtime Math series.

Each book offers multiple evenings of Bedtime Math because they beg to be read little-by-little, with time set aside for thinking.

Bedtime Math: A Fun Excuse to Stay Up Late (Bedtime Math Series)

Bedtime Math: This Time It’s Personal (Bedtime Math Series)

Bedtime Math: The Truth Comes Out (Bedtime Math Series)

BedtimeMath.org offers FREE Bedtime Math resources to complement the books.  Check out the Daily Math for blog articles about fun real-life math topics.  You can download a Wacky Math app that brings Bedtime Math to your device–daily problems, articles, etc.

Bedtime Math has a section for educators.  The author asks educators to encourage bedtime math at home, rather than making it part of school.  She also suggests starting an after-school math club, for which she will provide ideas and curriculum.  Very generous.  However, I think the educators section should be taken with a grain of salt.  Remember, its advice is from the perspective of an accomplished mom of privileged kids, not a teacher whose students run the gamut.

Starting an after-school club opens a whole can of worms.  A) you’ll be working for free B) you have to wonder whether school liability insurance and protections extend to after-school clubs–most elementary schools aren’t set up for them C) you are responsible for making sure the kids get home safely.  If they walk, it won’t be in the safety of huge crowds of kids, and if they get picked up–well, the pickup might be an hour late or not at all.

Regarding the idea to keep Bedtime Math for home only: not everyone has a parent who loves math–or even likes it a little bit.  Not everyone has a parent who reads bedtime stories.  Heck, not everyone has a parent who actually enforces bedtime–and provides a real bed.  Plus–not everyone has a parent who speaks/reads English.

Some kids may never experience Bedtime Math unless it is at school.  Consider your school’s circumstances and decide whether Bedtime Math is something to recommend to parents or do at school.  Also consider that families may be much more interested in Bedtime Math after you whet kids’ appetites at school.

Posted in Academics,Fun With Literacy,Math by Corey Green @ Sep 21, 2015

 

Constitution Day

Washington_Constitutional_Convention_1787Teach your students about the Constitution using FREE high-quality resources.  Sandra Day O’Connor’s iCivics.org has superb resources–whole units, complete with PowerPoint presentations, worksheets, teaching materials, and high-quality online games.  As usual, Scholastic has assembled an excellent collection of materials for all grade levels.

Another good site is National Archives Constitution Day resources.  This includes a simulation of the confusion and complexity delegates faced as they first met to create the Constitution.  The directions are ready-to-use, and all you need are envelopes and paperclips.  Curious?  Here’s the activity.

I hope you and your students enjoy Constitution Day.  To me, it’s the Beezus to Independence Day’s Ramona.   Like Beezus Quimby, Constitution Day is serious and focused.  Like Ramona, Independence Day is fun and playful.

iCivics.org Scholastic
All curriculum units

Road to the Constitution unit

Constitution unit

Justice by the People unit

Celebrate Constitution Day

Constitution Game

Posted in Academics,Holidays,Social Studies by Corey Green @ Sep 14, 2015

 

Book review: Ashley Bryan’s Puppets

61XELAshKqL._SY496_BO1,204,203,200_Immerse your students in the lush multi-sensory pleasures of Ashley Bryan’s Puppets.  This unique picture book tells the story of Ashley Bryan’s puppets, made from found objects and inspired by African culture.

Ashley Bryan’s Puppets is not a picture book that children would pick up on their own.  It is sophisticated and intellectual, requiring a teacher or parent to help the child derive meaning from it.

…but oh, what depth of meaning!  Ashley showcases dozens of his puppets and highlights several with poems about the puppet’s meaning, inspiration from African culture, and construction.

This picture book would be great to share with a whole class.  I would read a poem or two a day.  That would let the students appreciate each one’s individual beauty.  The students will want to thumb through the book and enjoy the lush photography of each puppet, but their attention spans will appreciate reading just a poem or two at a time.

The class might enjoy making found-object puppets and researching other puppets and puppeteers.  Students might enjoy learning more about Ashley Bryan and reading his many books.   Check out the Ashley Bryan Center in Isleford, Maine.

Posted in Book Reviews,Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ Sep 7, 2015