More tips on building a sub kit

teacheratdeskI recommend that substitute teachers  bring their own materials and activities.  A sub kit comes in handy, especially for those days when the teacher did not leave lesson plans.

I got the sub kit idea from Kid-Kits in The Baby-Sitters Club.  Club president Kristy invented Kid-Kits.  Her logic was that kids love to play with novel toys and activities.  The toys don’t have to be new, just new to the kid.  The baby-sitters stocked their Kid-Kits with old board games, art supplies, books, etc.  Click here to see the contents of the girls’ Kid-Kits at the official Baby-sitters Club site.

Here are my suggestions for building a substitute teacher’s Kid-Kit.

Class set of printable puzzles, etc.  You can copy these for each new job, or put masters in page protectors and bring dry-erase markers.  You can buy markers at dollar stores.  Another option: use crayons. Tissues will wipe crayon marks off page protectors.

Mazes: (I like the ones at KrazyDad.)  Use easy or medium mazes.  The hard ones are too hard.

Word searches:  a quick Google search for printable word searches will yield many results.  Just make sure that your word search prints on one page.  Some of them put the words on one page and the jumble of letters on another.  SuperWordSearchPuzzles.com has good puzzles that print all on one page.

Logic puzzles: don’t break these out unless you are prepared to teach a lesson on how to do them.  A great source: logic-puzzles.org.

Squishy ball: bring a ball for Silent Ball, an all-time-favorite classroom game.  Basically, it’s a silent game of catch.  Many kids make it an elimination game.  If you miss a catch or make a really bad throw, you’re out.  You’re also out if you talk.  Kids LOVE this game!

Storybooks and picture books:

Bring a collection of fun stories for kids.  You can check them out of the local library or buy some at used bookstores or library sales.  Another option is to visit the school library before school and ask for a book.

Another good option is a chapter book that is really a collection of short stories  You can read a chapter or two to each class.  Ir you return to a class, they will be excited to hear more chapters.  Here are some kids’ favorites:

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren and all the sequels

Paddington books by Michael Bond and all the sequels

The Stories Julian Tells and Ann Cameron’s other books about Julian

A Long Way From Chicago by Richard Peck

Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books by Peggy Parish

The Complete Adventures of Curious George by H. A. Rey

Good luck at your sub job!  Click here for my first post on building a sub kit.


 

Book Review: Fly Away Home by Eve Bunting

Fly Away HomeAR Book level 2.7
AR Points 0.5
Available at Amazon.com

Fly Away Home is a powerful picture book about homelessness.  The narrator and his father live at the airport.  In spare prose, the boy tells his story.

“My dad and I live in an airport . . . the airport is better than the streets.”  So begins the narrative by a young boy who matter-of-factly describes his daily existence.  The simple text touches on many emotions: sadness  because the boy lost his mother, anger and resentment of those who have a home, and hope and hopelessness.  The title Fly Away Home refers to an episode wherein the boy is given hope when a bird trapped in the airport flies to freedom.

This book makes a great readaloud and springboard for discussion.  While listening, students will be so quiet that you could hear a pin drop.  They are utterly sympathetic to the family’s plight.  After reading, discussions of homelessness, loss of a parent, and hope follow naturally.

The illustrations complement the text.  Ronald Himler’s watercolors show the vast impersonal nature of the airport and the efforts of the boy and his father to fade into the background.  Often, the two are quite literally in the background.  The pictures convey intense loneliness and determination.

My students often make the connection to The Pursuit of Happyness starring Will Smith and his son, Jaden Smith.  That movie dramatizes the true story of a man who became a successful stockbroker despite the significant obstacle of having neither money nor a home.

Click here for a lesson plan and worksheet (on page 3.)

Posted in Book Reviews by Corey Green @ Jul 21, 2014

 

Tips for substitute teachers: easy activities and lessons

The Three Musketeers

If you substitute teach long enough, you will wind up subbing for a teacher who didn’t leave lesson plans.  Suddenly you will have to plan a full day of lessons and activities.  A more common problem is that the teacher’s lesson plan didn’t take long enough, and you have to fill an extra hour or two.  Here are some time-tested activities that elementary students love.  All of them are easy for substitutes to pull together.

My best advice to subs: when all else fails, read a story.   Even naughty classes will usually sit still for a story.  Grab one off the shelves or call to the office, librarian or a neighboring teacher for an age-appropriate picture book.

After you read the story, tie in an activity.

  • Illustrate your favorite part in the story
  • Write a paragraph about your favorite part and illustrate it
  • Create a “written retelling” or summary of the story
  • Write a new ending or a twist on the story
  • Do some sort of writing/drawing activity that pops into your mind while you are reading

Create comic strips: kids love to create comic strips. All you need is a piece of paper for each student.  Plain white copy paper is best, but notebook paper will do in a pinch.  Teach students to divide the paper in eighths by folding it in half, then half again, then once more.  If you’re feeling ambitious, teach the kids that this is two to the third power or show them how ¼ is half of a half, and 1/8 is half of ¼.  Your call on whether this is a good idea.

Comic strips can be an open-ended project, or they can tie into the curriculum.  Comic strips work well with social studies and science lessons.

Write & draw: My students love to do design-and-write lessons.  Kids will enjoy designing their own castle, tree house, club house, etc. and writing about its special features.

Good luck!  After you’ve done all these activities, read another story to those kids!

Other ClassAntics posts on substitute teaching:

How to build emergency sub plans

Benefits of being a substitute teacher

Posted in Substitutes,Tips for Teachers by Corey Green @ Jul 14, 2014

 

Ruth Heller’s Designs for Coloring

RuthHellerFlowersA good coloring page should be part of every teacher’s Emergency Sub Plans.  Ruth Heller’s designs for coloring are high-quality, engrossing designs that boys and girls love to color.  I highly recommend that every elementary teacher own one or two.

I first learned of Ruth Heller’s coloring books when a colleague shared the Snowflakes book.  I used them to help the kids create personalized calendars for their parents.  The class would be silent for forty minutes straight as the kids colored their snowflakes.  At other times of the year, this is forty minutes a teacher can ill afford to devote to coloring.  However, during mid-December in a particularly snowy year with no recess, it was just fine.

Your class will love all of Ruth Heller’s Designs for Coloring.  The books can easily become projects.  Use the Flowers designs as the basis for Mother’s Day cards.  Use the Butterflies design for decorations to go with your science unit on butterflies.  Prisms and Geometrics can accompany a math lesson; Leaves go with a plant unit or autumn leaves lessons.  All linked books are available at Amazon.com, where you will find still more of Ruth Heller’s Designs for Coloring.

Happy coloring!

Posted in Book Lists,Tips for Teachers by Corey Green @ Jul 7, 2014