What would you have been before modern education?

We have so many educational options, but what was life like before that?  Read on for a fascinating infographic that will make even the most reluctant student quite happy to be in a modern school.  Your students will enjoy learning about what people studied in the past.  From Neolithic hunting & gathering lessons to medieval universities, it’s all here and it’s all fascinating.

Before Modern Education
Source: BestDegreePrograms.org

Posted in Academics by Corey Green @ May 26, 2014

 

Low-budget whiteboard markers and cleaners

markersHere are some cheap and easy ideas for whiteboards: markers, cleaners and student whiteboards.  Perfect for today’s teachers, who outfit their classrooms on their own dime!

Whiteboard cleaner

Expo Whiteboard Cleaner does the job, but it adds up over the course of a school year.  However, a rubbing alcohol solution can do the trick, too.  You can dilute the rubbing alcohol with distilled water for a solution that is less potent and smelly.  In a pinch, hand sanitizer does the job because of the alcohol content.

Rubbing alcohol is also effective at removing marks from a permanent marker.

Whiteboard markers

Expo is the standard for dry erase markers, but the brand is pricy.  A few years ago, I was buying fine-tip Expo markers at almost a dollar a pop when our class supply ran out.  Now my local Dollar Tree stocks four-packs for a dollar.  The best are packs with only black.  The colored dry-erase ink tends to be more difficult to erase—particularly the red!  Consider yourself warned.

Low-budget whiteboards

Many teachers like to teach math by having students work out problems on individual whiteboards.  Those whiteboards are pricy.  A cheap alternative: page protectors. Slide paper or cardstock inside and you’re good to go!

Tip: buy cheap page protectors.  Thick, high-quality ones do not erase!!!

Click for my post with more details on Cheap “whiteboards” for no-budget classrooms.


 

Book Review: Across the Alley by Richard Michelson

AR book level 4.0
AR points 0.5
Available at Amazon.comAcross the Alley

Across the Alley is a powerful picture book about what separates people: cultural and racial differences, not the small alley between their buildings.  Richard Michelson’s prose and E.B. Lewis’s illustrations meld into a lovely book that’s perfect for a readaloud and discussion.

The story takes place in New York City, where Abe and Willie live across the alley from each other.  Abe is Jewish and Willie is black.  During the day, they don’t talk.  But at night, they have a secret friendship across the alley.

The boys are hemmed in by their cultures, not only in their friendships but in their pursuits.  However, they find that Abe doesn’t really like playing violin—but Willie is a natural.  Likewise, with a little help from Willie, Abe soon outdoes the teacher when it comes to pitching.

Then one night, Abe’s grandfather catches them.  What will happen to their friendship Across the Alley?

*Spoiler alert: the boys inspire their families and everyone becomes friends in the light.

Across the Alley segues nicely into classroom discussions about a variety of topics:

  • One advantage of befriending people who are different from you is that you learn new things.  How does Across the Alley illustrate this point?
  • Young people have a way of crossing cultural divides, sometimes persuading their families to do so.  How do the young people in Across the Alley influence the old?
  • New York City life and the culture of Jewish and African-American people at the time of Across the Alley
  • Baseball: Negro LeaguesSatchel Paige and other players mentioned in the book
  • Jewish culture: learn about synagogues, such as the one where Willie gives a recital
  • Prejudices against both boys’ cultures: Abe faces anti-Semitism and Willie faces racism.  This isn’t shown in the book, but it was all but inescapable at the time.
Posted in Book Reviews,Fun With Literacy by Corey Green @ May 12, 2014

 

Free worksheets for the Tapestry series by Henry Neff

TheHoundOfRowanBring the fantasy series The Tapestry into the classroom with FREE worksheets written by a National Board Certified teacher.

Have you discovered The Tapestry series? It’s a richly imagined fantasy about a Chicago boy who stumbles upon a mysterious Celtic tapestry. His discovery leads him to Rowan Academy, a secret school where great things await him.

The Tapestry series stands out because of the beautiful writing and gorgeous illustrations. The illustrations are my favorite part. Author Henry Neff is a great artist, and it’s interesting to see the world so vividly illustrated by the person that created it.  Click here for a gallery of Henry Neff’s illustrations for Book One: The Hound of Rowan.

The Tapestry series is four books strong and growing, with Book Five set for release in 2015. I met author Henry Neff early on, when we presented together at the International Reading Association Annual Conference West. Henry presented his book; I presented worksheets and ideas for teaching The Tapestry in the classroom.

Books in The Tapestry series, all available at Amazon.com:
The Hound of Rowan: Book One of The Tapestry

The Second Siege: Book Two of The Tapestry

The Fiend and the Forge: Book Three of The Tapestry

The Maelstrom: Book Four of The Tapestry

The Red Winter: Book Five of The Tapestry

My worksheets:
What Do You See? In The Tapestry, Max saw a tapestry depicting the Cattle Raid of Cooley. He later learns that he may have abilities like those of Cuchulain, the Irish folk hero. What qualities link you to heroes of the past?

Vye Detector: In The Tapestry, Vyes are minions of The Enemy. It is important to be able to identify them:

“A vye is not a werewolf. The vye is larger, with a more distorted and hideous face—part wolf, part jackal, part human, with squinty eyes and a twisted snout. In human form, however, they can be most convincing….They are clever in their deceits and their voices are wound with spells to ensnare you.”

After a Vye attack at Rowan, students receive extra training in identifying and fighting Vyes. In the following scenarios, how would you identify and fight a Vye?

Create Your Own Charge: In The Tapestry, students are paired with mythical animals who will be their charges and companions for the rest of their lives. In the book, the animals choose the students. Max was chosen by Nick, the lymrill. It is difficult to describe a mythical animal—until you organize.

Workers for Rowan: Like any school, Rowan depends on workers to help the school run smoothly. The cooks are a reformed hag and ogre, and a leprechaun is the bathroom attendant.  The following creatures want to work at Rowan. Match the creatures with the best job for them.

Enjoy The Tapestry!